A Lament for the Parcel at 250 North Main Street

There will be no monument for you.
No quarried pink granite statue,
no sleek wall with carved names,
or plaque at which we leave flowers.

What irony, to leave flowers at your grave,
to finger spell the name M-A-P-L-E on cold stone,
where hands used to touch warm bark,
feel sweet time seep through veins.

Nothing will fly at half-mast,
not the flag that claims your land,
or the birds that claimed your branches
as sacred choir loft.

There will be no moment of silence,
no annual tolling of bells
or communal lament for lives lost,
its long list of names retold:

Beech

Birch

Cedar

Cherry

Dogwood

Fir

Hemlock

Hickory

Hornbeam

Laurel

Maple

Oak

Pine

Poplar

Sassafras

Spruce

Tulip

Walnut

As we walk across your grave
for daily purchase and progress,
heads bowed against concrete winds,
no one will weep or remember your songs.

Poem ©2016, Jen Payne. Aerial views courtesy of Google Maps, 2014, 2017.

If you like this poem, then you’ll LOVE Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind.
Purchase a signed copy today, get a FREE gift!


13 – Extant

The nautilus shell
is complicated.

Mathematical —
its presentation
logarithmic,
mirror of the
greatest storms,
the largest galaxies…
Miraculous!

Its whole wide whorl
compartmentalized,
with past lives
in secret chambers —
where poetry is found
no less.

The poetry of time,
this old soul,
reminder of
roots and bones,
our beginnings
and our end.

Poem ©2018, Jen Payne. National Poetry Month 2018, #13. If you like this poem, you’ll find 80 more the book EVIDENCE OF FLOSSING: WHAT WE LEAVE BEHIND! Purchased your signed copy today! CLICK HERE

The 2017 Goodreads Reading Challenge (Yay!)

For the second time in five years, I successfully completed my Goodreads Reading Challenge, reading 50 books in 2017! In a year fraught with way too much reality, fiction was the name of the game: magical children, brave creatures, curious characters, time travelers, mystics. Yes, yes. yes!

This year’s tally of 11,193 pages otherwise included 8 books of poetry, 10 non-fiction, and 4 children’s books. Also on the list were a few Young Adult novels including the final book in Ransom Riggs’ Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series, as well as the Last Survivors series by Susan Beth Pfeffer. (The first of which, Life As We Knew It, remains the most haunting book I read this year.)

According to star-ratings, my least favorite books in 2017 were The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondō and Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi.

There were a few other low-star rated books—mostly me wandering out-of-genre (Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Jaren Russell) or buying into hype (The Light Between Oceans, M.L. Stedman).

I was generous with my five-stars this year, but I always am. If it captures my attention, makes me wonder, keeps me interested to the final page? Yes! Bestsellers like Dan Brown, Amy Bloom, and Mary Oliver, of course, but even more so for friends and local authors like Luanne Castle, Robert Finch, Gordy Whiteman and Nan Meneely. What delights!

(Was it shameless of me to include my own book, Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind, in the mix?)

A few classics showed up this year—The Long Christmas Dinner by Thornton Wilder, and A Child’s Christmas in Wales by Dylan Thomas—and a few personal favorites returned (Thanks Elizabeth Gilbert and Alice Hoffman!)

The most memorable books of the year? Life After Life by Kate Atkinson, The Comet Seekers by Helen Sedgwick, and The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elisabeth Tova Bailey.

But my most favorite (also probably most recommended) was definitely the Roland Merullo Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner with Buddha series. I thoroughly enjoyed each book with equal measure and still pine for Rinpoche’s humor and wisdom—some seven months since turning the last page.

That this year’s collection of favorites included the counsel of a Buddhist monk, pages and pages poetry, and a dystopian end-of-the-world series is not ironic. It is, I think, reflective of this new and startling world in which we find ourselves.

Thankfully, so is the book I’m reading today. In Braving the Wilderness, social scientist Brené Brown outlines a clear path out of our “spiritual crisis of disconnection” by advising that “People are hard to hate close up, move in; Speak truth to BS, be civil; Hold hands, with strangers; Strong Back, strong front, wild heart.”

And so we bravely go…2018. Are you ready? And are you reading?

BOOK REVIEW by Writer Christopher Liccardi

“I have to say, this book not only struck a nerve but felt more relevant with each page I read. Jennifer has captured the seemingly inexhaustible supply of humanity in a collection of poems and street photography pictures that speak volumes about what we leave behind. ” – Christopher Liccardi

>> CLICK HERE to read the full review.


This review is part of a month-long, nationwide blog tour for my new book Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind, hosted by Wow! Women on Writing. Buy the book today!

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BOOK REVIEW by Rita Kowats, Spirituality Without Borders

“Jen Payne’s book, Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind, carries prophetic power in the spaces between its words. It is truth and beauty delivered to us in wide-eyed wonder by a child’s heart passionately in love with nature.” – Rita Kowats, Spirituality Without Borders

>> CLICK HERE to read the full review.


This review is part of a month-long, nationwide blog tour for my new book Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind, hosted by Wow! Women on Writing. Buy the book today!

buynow


BOOK REVIEW by Poet Joss Burnel

“Not only will Jen make you feel, think and ponder your own walk through life, but her book has photography that will do the same. Poetry as social commentary has a long history of impacting our world…” – Joss Burnel, Depth of A Woman

>> CLICK HERE to read the full review.


This review is part of a month-long, nationwide blog tour for my new book Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind, hosted by Wow! Women on Writing. Buy the book today!

buynow


BOOK REVIEW by Author Mary O’Connor

“Poet by nature and street photographer by perspective, author Jennifer Payne turns to the curious thematic image of a flosser to make an arresting statement in her new book about our world and about how, in so many ways, we influence its being. The thought of marrying a cast-off dental apparatus with such discordant thoughts as the randomness of salvation, or whether spiders sing or god flosses, struck me at first as odd, incongruous at best. But after reading the opening words of Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind, I was caught…” – Mary O’Connor

>> CLICK HERE to read the full review.


This review is part of a month-long, nationwide blog tour for my new book Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind, hosted by Wow! Women on Writing. Buy the book today!

buynow


BOOK REVIEW by Poet Luanne Castle

“To help heal our planet and ourselves, we first have to look outward to go inward. Jen Payne’s new book of poetry and photographs inspires us to do just that. Using the unique and cohesive symbol of the pocket dental flosser, Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind explores nature and our place within our environment…Payne’s poetry is the nuanced, living force of the collection. What drives that force is a love of nature’s beauties, a love that Payne wants readers to experience.” – Luanne Castle

>> CLICK HERE to read the full review.


This review is part of a month-long, nationwide blog tour for my new book Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind, hosted by Wow! Women on Writing. Buy the book today!

buynow


BOOK SIGNING with Author/Naturalist Jen Payne

Rock Garden in Branford, December 16, 12-3pm

Dental flossers? Seriously? Come find out the real meaning behind the book Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind at a Book Signing with local writer and naturalist Jen Payne, hosted by Rock Garden in Branford on Saturday, December 16 from 12 – 3pm.

Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Professor Peter Raymond says “This collection of writing and photographs powerfully remind us that our everyday actions effect the environment. Jen Payne’s writing underscores our role as stewards and the positive impact we can make on the world around us.”

Evidence of Flossing: What We Leave Behind
follows on the heels of Payne’s 2014 well-received book LOOK UP! Musings on the Nature of Mindfulness, and continues a dialogue about our innate connection with nature.

Both books will be available at the event, which is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. Rock Garden is located at 17 South Main Street, Branford, CT.

For more information and to purchase copies of the book, please visit www.3chairspublishing.com.

IMAGE No. 014-0415 – Supply Ponds Nature Preserve, Branford, Connecticut; by Jen Payne, April 2015